December 2013 Archives

Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP) Status 30 December 2013

Dennis Wingo Status, end of day, December 30, 2013.Well, I finished through W4-078 today. Got 11 tapes done so that's pretty good. I am coming in tomorrow to get as many done as I can.

Lots of spacecraft problems on these images.....

Working today. Playing tape W4-074 right now. Hope to get to 80 today but we will see. I am going to get to the end of Woomera tapes by Friday and start immediately on the Goldstone tapes.

Woomera ends at W4-107 I think...

Research Data Disappears Fast

Scientists losing data at a rapid rate, Nature

"In their parents' attic, in boxes in the garage, or stored on now-defunct floppy disks -- these are just some of the inaccessible places in which scientists have admitted to keeping their old research data. Such practices mean that data are being lost to science at a rapid rate, a study has now found. "Most of the time, researchers said 'it's probably in this or that location', such as their parents' attic, or on a zip drive for which they haven't seen the hardware in 15 years" .... "In theory, the data still exist, but the time and effort required by the researcher to get them to you is prohibitive."

Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP) Status 20 December 2013

Dennis Wingo Status, end of day, December 20, 2013.

Finished through tape W4-068 today, making good progress. However, it seems that the spacecraft was having a lot of problems and thus I don't really have a good handle on exactly how many images we captured today.

Will hopefully be able to sort it out when I get this book CR-1093 which I am going to work on during the holidays. I have a copy ordered from NTIS and hopefully it will get here before I return on December 30th.

Other than that I hope that everyone has a happy and prosperous holiday season and may Santa bring you your heart's desires....

A New Member of the LOIRP Team

Dennis Wingo: I would like to introduce everyone to the newest member of our LOIRP team, Marcos Colleluori. Marcos is a graduate student at San Jose State and is doing the work to cross reference our images to the LROC NAC images for the important science of crater and other difference detection between the 1960's and now.

Two Historic Earthrise Images In The News

NASA Releases New Apollo 8 Earthrise Simulation Video

"NASA has issued a new visualization of the events leading to one of the iconic photographs of the 20th Century - Earth rising over the moon captured by the crew of the Apollo 8 mission. The photo known as Earthrise is the first color photograph of Earth taken by a person in lunar orbit. Earthrise is the cover photo of TIME's Great Images of the 20th Century, and is the central photo on the cover of LIFE's 100 Photographs That Changed the World."

NASA Google+ Hangout: New Visualization 45th Anniversary of Apollo 8 Viewing Earth from Space

"NASA will host a Google+ hangout at 2 p.m. EST Friday, Dec. 20, to unveil a new simulation of the events leading to the creation of "Earthrise," one of the most iconic photographs of the 20th century. It was 45 years ago on Dec. 24, 1968, when Apollo 8 astronauts captured the photograph called "Earthrise," the first color photograph of Earth taken by a person orbiting the moon."

The First Earthrise Image Makes a Trip Back To The Moon

"On 19 November 2013, the first image ever taken of the Earth rising over the Moon's surface in 1966 was sent back to the Moon. This historic image, known as "Earthrise", was taken on 23 August 1966 by NASA's Lunar Orbiter 1. A full resolution electronic data file over 700 Mb in size containing this image was sent to the LADEE spacecraft currently in lunar orbit and then received back on Earth. The Earthrise image that was sent to LADEE was a restored and enhanced version created by the Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP) located at the Ames Research Park at Moffett Field, California. "

- How Life Magazine Revealed "Earthrise" in 1966
- Lunar Echoes on STS-130

Nimbus II and Lunar Orbiter 1 Imagery: A New Look at Earth in 1966

"... the National Snow and Ice Data Center, after seeing the work that the LOIRP team had done in potentially identifying the Antarctic sea ice in the Lunar Orbiter 1 Earthrise image, and recognizing the similarity between the raw data of the Nimbus and Lunar Orbiter data, provided a grant to the LOIRP team to process the Nimbus data into a modern format and to correct image artifacts that are common to both types of images. ... On this day, in New York City, just over the Earth's limb as seen from lunar orbit, the Beatles were preparing to play at Shea Stadium ..."

- Beatles Legend Among Those Honored with Mercury Craters, NASA

Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP) Status 19 December 2013

Dennis Wingo Status, end of day, December 19, 2013.

Well we are back in the saddle. Finished through tape W4-057 today. This puts us over half way. We have 50 Woomera LO-IV tapes to go now.... Lots of problems though with the spacecraft, lots of restarts of the image transfer process. More tomorrow then I am taking a week off for Christmas!

The First Earthrise Image Makes a Trip Back To The Moon

On 19 November 2013, the first image ever taken of the Earth rising over the Moon's surface in 1966 was sent back to the Moon.

This historic image, known as "Earthrise", was taken on 23 August 1966 by NASA's Lunar Orbiter 1.  A full resolution electronic data file over 700 Mb in size containing this image was sent to the LADEE spacecraft currently in lunar orbit and then received back on Earth. 

The NASA Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) system being tested during the LADEE mission allowed the image to be sent to and from the Moon in a fraction of the time required to originally send it back to Earth in 1966.

The Earthrise image that was sent to LADEE was a restored and enhanced version created by the Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP) located at the Ames Research Park at Moffett Field, California.  This enhanced image was originally re-released to the public in November 2008.

LOIRP Featured in The Atlantic

NASA's Original Lunar Images Are Housed in a Former McDonald's, The Atlantic

"At an old McDonald's at NASA Ames Research Park in Moffett Field, California, there are no Big Macs or chicken nuggets. Instead, there are reels and reels of original footage from the five lunar orbiters NASA launched in 1960. It's all part of the Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project, an effort by Dennis Wingo and colleagues to digitize the old tapes. What it means is that the first image of Earth as seen from behind the moon is located in this former fast food joint, known colloquially as "McMoon's."

Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP) Status 18 December 2013

Dennis WIngo: Status, end of day, December 18, 2013

Back to work! The new head works and Ken did all the adjustments and so we are back up and running! Late in the day however, and so I am only going to do one tape today as a verification step.

Doing W4-050 right now....

Will do as many as I can tomorrow to pick the ball back up.

A Closer Look at the Lunar Orbiter Spacecraft

This is one of the engineering flight spare Lunar Orbiter spacecraft on display at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC. Larger image

This diagram shows the major subsystems of the Lunar Orbiter spacecraft. Additional Photos below show the NASM exhibition from a variety of angles.

High School Team Tackles Lunar Mystery

Members of the 2011-12 Lunar Exploration Team: L-R Abby Delawder, Tori Wilson, and Austen Beason

When the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter relayed images in 2011 of oddly striped boulders on the moon - some of them a dozen or more meters across - three students at Kickapoo High School in Springfield, Missouri, in search of a class science project decided to investigate. They joined a 2-semester research program through the SSERVI's Center for Lunar Science and Exploration in Houston, Texas.

With mentor Georgiana Kramer, a planetary scientist there, the team has now netted a scientific paper. The Kickapoo Lunar Research Team spent several months trying to explain the stripes. Researchers had already floated several possibilities.

Kramer suspected that the light-colored layers were probably regolith, material blasted from impact craters elsewhere on the moon. But the students found that such debris accumulates much too slowly to account for the banding. Through their calculations, they arrived at a new explanation: The striping formed as molten material cooled deep within the moon's crust. "I was surprised at the answer they came up with," Kramer says. But the team has support for the theory: Some banded rocks on Earth form by a similar process, says team member Abby Delawder. "These banded rocks are nothing like any other rocks found on the moon's surface," she notes. "It's clear they were blasted upward by an impact."

Unlike the average high school project, this one appeared among graduate student posters at NASA's annual Lunar Science Institute Forum in Mountain View, California, in 2012 and will be published in a forthcoming issue of the journal Icarus.

Posted by: Soderman/SSERVI Staff Source: SSERVI Team/ Ref: SCIENCE, VOL 342, DECEMBER 6 2013

Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP) Status 10 December 2013

Dennis Wingo: Status December 10, 2013

Thanks to Jim we may have found the reference I need so that it is not such an incredible pain to get the image numbers from the tapes. We will check it out tomorrow.

As of right now we are more than 1/3rd the way through the Woomera tapes for Lunar Orbiter IV, finishing up W4-038 before I leave today. These are all long captures so the number of tapes per day is fewer than what I would like, but it is getting all the data so it is good.

Looking at some of the LO-IV images, they have some absolutely outstanding data on them. Lunar Orbiter IV was the first images of the Moon that I worked with and they have always been some of the most dramatic....

Still trying to get to W4-070 by the end of the day Friday. Goals are good!. If we can do that or get close I should be finished with Woomera before next Friday and be started on the Goldstone captures!

Fun stuff to watch the scenes go by!

Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project Featured on "Raw Science"

"YouTube sensation Veritasium visits an abandoned McDonalds on the NASA Ames campus to reveal the first original lunar images, now being converted from film to digital media with the NASA LOIRP project. Watch the transformation of the original lunar Earth rise!"

Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP) Status 9 December 2013

Dennis Wingo: Status December 9, 2013

A bit of fun today. Been filling in the gap between W4-11 and W4-19 today with some images still foggy due to light getting into the camera system, not radiation as I first supposed (I still don't know if I buy the explanation though).

During the recording of W4-17 I heard something that I had only heard once before on the tapes, a female voice. Here it is along with a bit more audio...

It takes several seconds for the audio to start in earnest and the female voice segment is short...

Crap, it won't let me upload an mp3. Any suggestions?

Madrid Lunar Orbiter V Tapes

Dennis Wingo: Here are our Madrid Lunar Orbiter V tapes after their completion.! (h/t to James Snyder for catching the autocorrect snafu). Larger view

Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP) Status 6 December 2013

Dennis Wingo Status, Friday evening, December 6th 2013.

Well got some tapes done today after skipping into the 20's. Am going backward and will figure everything out on Monday. We are as far as W4-028 but did not do 11-18, 23....

Should have it back on track Monday. Not bad though, should be more than half way through Woomera for LO-IV by next Friday.

Dennis Wingo Lunar Orbiter Status, mid day Friday December 6, 2013

Frustrating week. First, we can't find, or it does not exist, the same table (Photography and Operational Data Summary) that we have for Lunar Orbiter II, III, and V. That makes it a LOT harder to identify the images per their sequence numbers.

Second, the first ten Woomera tapes had two very noisy images and the rest of the tapes had nothing on them. There are some vague references to radiation fogging but I just bet they did not want that kind of information out there in the 1960's before the Apollo missions. As an FYI, if the November 1972 flare had happened during the Apollo 17 mission we would have had three crispy astronauts.

I jumped all the way to W4-28 and found images, but still with some film fogging. In looking at the LPI images there are some pretty big gaps. Will be interesting to see what our image captures show.

I have run W4-25-28 now and am running backward until I hit the blank images. It is also going to be a pain in the rear to identify the images but will get it done.

Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP) Status 4 December 2013

Dennis Wingo: Update Wednesday December 4, 2013

We have captured the framelets to complete LOV-115M from tape W5-122. We are capturing the frame lets that we missed before for image LOV-117H from tape W5-121. When this is through in a few minutes we will be complete with our Lunar Orbiter V image captures. On to Lunar Orbiter IV tomorrow!

Oh yes: Austin Epps says that we now have captured over 80,000 framelets!

Dennis Wingo: Status, Wednesday December 4, 2013

I have finished going over every image and tape to see if we have missed capturing anything. We found a tape (M5-110) that had a few frame lets that completed an image (LOV-119M) and a few images and frame lets not properly accounted for in the "book" that we have on tape. We have found one tape that I did not get all the frame lets that we needed off of, and one tape (both Woomera) with a single frame let that we need.

Will get the machine recallibrated for Woomera then get these frame lets and then hopefully tomorrow recalibrate and start running Woomera LOIV tapes!

Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP) Status 3 December 2013

Dennis Wingo: Status, end of day, December 3, 2013

Well, Lunar Orbiter V raw image captures are essentially complete! The last tape, LOV-157 had a blank image and the first high res image so we know we are done and are not missing any tapes. That's the good news. the bad news is that we heard on the audio link today that Woomera had a catastrophic failure of their FR-900 and thus several images were lost there. We see that in our record. Don't know if there are overlaps to fix it but will investigate.

Tomorrow we will go back and fill up a couple of small gaps that we know about with a Woomera tape, and check all of our accounting to make sure that we have everything that can be gotten with LOV. The really good news is that our recovery of data is well above 99%. That is impressive with 45 year old tapes. There was a lot of duplication with this mission and that helped a lot but we only had about 4 or 5 bad tapes. Pretty darned good for old American technology!

Here are the tapes and images captured yesterday and today.

M5-126, partial capture LOV-5059M (completes image with overlap with W5-27, 28, and 150)
M5-127, not needed, overlap with W5-028
M5-128, partial capture LOV-5059H (completes image with overlap of W5-028)
M5-129, complete capture LOV-5057M
M5-130, partial capture LOV-5056M (completes image with W5-025)
M5-131, not needed, duplicate of W5-021,022
M5-132, partial capture LOV-5055H (completes image with overlap of W5-023)
M5-133, complete capture LOV-5053M (even though we have part of this image on W5-019)
M5-134, not needed, overlap with G5-146
M5-135, partial capture LOV-5051M (overlap with G5-147 but a couple of frame lets missing)
M5-136, not needed, duplicate of G5-147
M5-137, not needed, duplicate of G5-021, W5-012
M5-138, not needed, overlap with G5-017
M5-139, partial capture LOV-033M (completes image with overlap of G5-018)
M5-140, partial capture LOV-032M (completes image with overlap of G5-019)
M5-141, not needed duplicate of G5-015
M5-142, not needed duplicate of G5-016
M5-143, partial capture LOV-031H (completes image with overlap of G5-016), partial capture 030M (completes image with overlap of G5-016)
M5-144, partial capture LOV-029M (completes image with overlap of M5-011)
M5-145, not needed, overlap of M5-011,012
M5-146, partial capture LOV-5028H (completes image with overlap of G5-147')
M5-147, not needed, duplicate of G5-148
M5-148, partial capture LOV-011M (completes image with overlap of W5-001)
M5-149, complete capture LOV-011M (though we do have frame lets from W5-001), partial capture LOV-011H, partial capture 010M (completes image with overlap of W5-002)
M5-150, partial capture LOV-011H (completes image with previous tape)
M5-151, complete capture LOV-009M, 010H
M5-152, complete capture LOV-008M, 009H
M5-153, complete capture LOV-007M, partial capture 008H
M5-154, partial capture LOV-008H (completes image with previous tape)
M5-155, complete capture LOV-006M, 007H
M5-156, complete capture LOV-005M, 006H
M5-157, complete capture LOV-004M (blank image), 005H

This completes the Madrid captures except for stragglers and gak reruns!

Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP) Status 2 December 2013

Dennis WIngo: Status, end of day, December 2, 2013.

Today has been a marathon tape day. We started with M5-126 and made it al l the way through M5-150! Lots of not neededs and few frame let captures but we are now to the final day of image capture (from the ground station's perspective) and we will complete through M5-158 tomorrow, good lord willing and the creek don't rise as the old saying goes.

Will do the final listing after I finish the tapes tomorrow.

We will then go back and see what we have missed. I know of a couple of images that we mistakenly did not capture from Woomera. However, it is highly likely that by CoB Wednesday, we will have finished the Lunar Orbiter V captures. This mission had by far the most tapes and images. There are many really cool images that are NOT on the LPI website or the USGS. We look forward to providing these to the lunar science community...

LOIRP
- About
- Contact

Categories

 

RECOMMENDED BOOKS

Moonrush: Improving Life on Earth with the Moon's Resources
Moonrush: Improving Life on Earth with the Moon's Resources

The Kaguya Lunar Atlas: The Moon in High Resolution
The Kaguya Lunar Atlas: The Moon in High Resolution

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission
Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission

Lunar Orbiter Photographic Atlas of the Near Side of the Moon
Lunar Orbiter Photographic Atlas of the Near Side of the Moon

The Far Side of the Moon: A Photographic Guide
The Far Side of the Moon: A Photographic Guide

The Clementine Atlas of the Moon
The Clementine Atlas of the Moon

The International Atlas of Lunar Exploration
The International Atlas of Lunar Exploration

Voices from the Moon: Apollo Astronauts Describe Their Lunar Experiences
Voices from the Moon: Apollo Astronauts Describe Their Lunar Experiences

Apollo: Through the Eyes of the Astronauts
Apollo: Through the Eyes of the Astronauts

Space News
- Moon Today
- SpaceRef

Social Media
- Facebook
- Twitter
- Google+

MoonViews

Monthly Archives

PARTICIPANTS
- NASA SSERVI
- Skycorp
- SpaceRef
LUNAR ORBITER
- Overview
- LPI Image Archive
- Documents

LUNAR MISSIONS
Scientific
- Apollo
- ARTEMIS - Chandrayaan-1
- Chandrayaan-2
- Chang'e-1
- Chang'e-2
- Clementine
- GRAIL - Kaguya
- Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter
- LCROSS
- Luna
- Lunakhod
- Lunar Prospector
- Ranger
- SMART-1
- Surveyor
- Zond

Visit the MoonViews store