August 2013 Archives

Lunar Orbiter 3 Image 3092_H2

This newly retrieved high resolution image, frame 3092_H2, was taken by Lunar Orbiter 3 on 18 February 1967 at 07:32 GMT LPI reference. Images: [large at LOIRP] [Very Large at NASA NLSI]

LOIRP Status Report 29 August 2013

Dennis Wingo: Status mid day August 29, 2013.

Not running tapes all day today, other paperwork to get through. Did four tapes this morning and it is getting interesting juggling the tapes. An obvious principle for you folks who have been reading this is to maximize the number of images while minimizing the amount of tapes to read and thus head wear. With 477 tapes, Lunar Orbiter V has 60% more tapes than any of the other missions and thus you would think there is a lot of overlap and there are.

Some of the overlap is easy as all you have to do is look at the sequence numbers and the GMT time on a tape to see when two tape machines were running at the same time. Thank God everything was in GMT! However, there are times when a tape would get changed in the middle of a read out (image transmission) from the spacecraft. Thus we lose framelets (parts of an image). You can see some of these losses today when you go to the www.lpi.usra.edu site. By the way, this project would have been impossible without all of their pioneering work to preserve LO images in the 1990's.

So, what we have after running the Woomera tapes are times, as I have stated before, of overlaps and sometimes the Goldstone tape would stop earlier or run longer than the Woomera tape. Today is one of these times in that we have multiple instances of this overlap that allows us to recover framelets that might otherwise be lost. It causes a headache in our accounting and image runs downstream as we usually do the work by a tape and it is a pain in the rear to merge multiple tapes into an image. Austin had been doing a lot of that work on the backend processing but now with my note leaving here I can not only communicate what is going on to you the reader, this is helping our team internally as I can lay out what I have done with individual tapes and how that integrates into the larger stream of assembling the images.

This is the case today. Here are the tapes run and the juggling between images and tapes.

G5-031, partial capture LOV-068H, 067H, complete capture 066M
G5-032, partial capture LOV-069M, 070H
G5-033, partial capture LOV-070H (completes image and overlaps with W5-139), partial capture 068M (completes image and overlaps with W5-140)
G5-034, partial capture LOV-072H (completes image and overlaps with W5-029), partial capture 070M (completes image and overlaps with W5-030)

The good news is that for G5-033 and 034 I only had to run about 5-10 minutes of each tape rather than 40+ minutes each. This saves enough head life for another tape!

Lunar Orbiter 3 Image 3085_H3

This newly retrieved high resolution image, frame 3085_H3, was taken by Lunar Orbiter 3 on 18 February 1967 at 04:03 GMT LPI reference. Images: [large at LOIRP] [Very Large at NASA NLSI]

LOIRP Status Report 28 August 2013

Dennis Wingo: Status August 28, 2013 late afternoon.

A pretty good day today, ran tapes G5-23-30 excepting 28-29 which are duplicates of W5-019-20. The tally for today.

G5-023, partial capture LOV-049M, 050H
G5-024, partial capture LOV-050H (completes image), complete capture 048M, partial capture 049H
G5-025, partial capture LOV-049H (almost completes image)
G5-026, partial capture LOV-051M, complete capture 052H
G5-027, partial capture LOV-050M, 049M, complete capture 051H
G5-028, not captured duplicate of W5-019
G5-029, not captured duplicate of W5-020
G5-030, partial capture LOV-067M, 068H

The overall status of the capture of Lunar Orbiter 5 is pretty good. To date we have captured all 163 of the Woomera tapes. We have captured 32 (two from earlier captures) of 158 of the Goldstone tapes. We have also previously captured 6 of 156 of the Madrid tapes.

This means that for all of LOV there are 477 tapes for which we have now captured 201 total tapes captured. It looks like about 2 out of ten of the Goldstone tapes are duplicates so out of 126 remaining that means that at a minimum we really only need to capture about another 102 tapes. For Madrid lets figure that four out of ten are duplicates because of the overlap between both Woomera and Goldstone. So out of 152 remaining Madrid tapes we need to capture about 90 tapes. Thus we have about 192 out of 477 tapes to go so we are basically about 60% through our LOV captures. Lets hope this head holds out!

LOIRP Status Report 27 August 2013

Dennis Wingo: Status, mid day August 27, 2013

Ran a tape yesterday, G5-011. The next two tapes (G5-012,013) are duplicates of W5-005, 006. We are going to run a few tapes today just to kee the ball rolling, we have kinda gotten stacked up as our framelet count for lunar orbiter is now up to over 64,000! (at 126 megabytes per finished framelet, that is a LOT of data i.e. 8 Terabytes).

G5-011, partial capture LOV-018M, 016M complete capture 019H
G5-012, not needed, duplicate of W5-005
G5-013, not needed, duplicate of W5-006
G5-014, partial capture LOV-029H, 028H complete capture 027M

G5-015 is in process now.

End of Day August 27, 2013

Ran several more tapes and found another couple that I don't have to run. Starting to look like a pattern which makes sense as the end of a Goldstone pass overlaps with the beginning of a Woomera pass. When we get to the Madrid tapes we will have their overlaps with Woomera and Goldstone already done....

Tapes for today since G5-014

G5-015, partial capture LOV-031M, complete capture 032H
G5-016, complete capture LOV-030M, 031H
G5-017, partial capture LOV-029M
G5-018. partial capture LOV-033M, complete capture 034H
G5-019, partial capture LOV-032M,033H
G5-020, partial capture LOV-033H (completes image), partial capture 031M (completes image [from G5-015])
G5-021, partial capture LOV-035M, partial capture 036H (completes image [from W5-012])
G5-022, not captured, overlap with W5-013

Most of G5-021 was an overlap with W5-012 but we still got some framelets that we did not have before, enough to complete another image.

So, we are making progress. With other things I have to do this week we are not going to get a lot done, but we will next week. I still want to get up to about G5-050 this week, which should be doable.

Lunar Orbiter 3 Image 3085_H1

This newly retrieved high resolution image, frame 3085_H1, was taken by Lunar Orbiter 3 on 18 February 1967 at 04:03 GMT LPI reference. Images: [large at LOIRP] [Very Large at NASA NLSI]

Lunar Orbiter 3 Image 3083_H2

This newly retrieved high resolution image, frame 3083_H2, was taken by Lunar Orbiter 3 on 17 February 1967 at 09:27 GMT LPI reference. Images: [large at LOIRP] [Very Large at NASA NLSI]

1967 Audio Recording on First Anniversary of Lunar Orbiter 1 Launch

This recording was made on a Lunar Orbiter analog data tape in August 1967 on the first anniversary of the launch of Lunar Orbiter 1 in August 1966.

LOIRP Status Report 23 August 2013

Dennis Wingo:

-- Status morning of August 23, 2013.

Yesterday I was rummaging through all of our heads and we found one that has some significant life left on it. We went through a long period where we had an anomalous failure that we could never explain where the machine would work just fine but the demodulator would be off frequency, thus preventing the reconstruction of an image. When we would change a head, most of the time it would fix it. Thus we had heads with some life left on them but they would not work.

One of Ken's friends (Terry) who used to work on FR-900's told us what was going on and since then we have been able to use some of these half or quarter or three quarter worn heads. We are putting another head on today and hopefully it will have enough life on it to get some more images.

We do this as the head that is mostly dead has had problems on two tapes out of six, and that is anomalously high, so maybe this will solve those problems.....

-- Status, end of Day August 23, 2013, 47 years after LO-1-101H

Ran 2.5 tapes today. We had a problem with G5-004 and G5-006 yesterday that we have confirmed is not head related. We can capture these images from Madrid tapes or the other end of Goldstone tapes later.

We have captured G5-007 and G5-010 today. G5-008 and 009 are duplicates of W5-003 and 004. This is what we expected to start seeing but it is gratifying anyway.

G5-007, partial capture LOV-013H, 011M
G5-010, partial capture LOV-019M, complete capture 020H

Next week we will start running more tapes in earnest since we have a head with more meat on it installed.

Lunar Orbiter 3 Image 3083_H1

This newly retrieved high resolution image, frame 3083_H1, was taken by Lunar Orbiter 3 on 17 February 1967 at 09:27 GMT LPI reference. Images: [large at LOIRP] [Very Large at NASA NLSI]

First Earthrise Photo Taken 47 Years Ago Today

Keith's note: 47 Years ago today, on 23 August 1966, Lunar Orbiter 1 snapped the first photo of Earth as seen from lunar orbit (Larger view). While a remarkable image at the time, the full resolution of the image was never retrieved from the data stored from the mission. In 2008, this earthrise image was restored by the Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project at NASA Ames Research Center. We obtained the original data tapes from the mission (the last surviving set) and restored original FR-900 tape drives to operational condition using both 60s era parts and modern electronics. The following links provide background on the image, its restoration, and reactions to its release.

Here is a comparison of the full image in its original, familiar context (higher res)(print quality). You can download a 1.2 GB version from NASA here. Note: this is a very large file.

- Newly Restored Lunar Orbiter Image of Earth and Moon (Detail)
- How the Photo Was Taken
- House of Representatives Honors Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project
- Nimbus II and Lunar Orbiter 1 Imagery: A New Look at Earth in 1966
- Dumpster Diving for Science, Science Magazine
- What Lunar Orbiter 1 Was Seeing on 23 August 1966

LOIRP Status Report 22 August 2013

Dennis Wingo: Status, late afternoon August 22nd.

I was running G5-004 this morning. It was supposed to have 55 minutes of video on it but after about 15 minutes the video went away. It is not the head causing it because I was able to back up and look at the video on the earlier part. I am at this second running G5-005 and this tape looks ok too. The loss of the video kills at least two images but the same data is on a tape with the sequence number 147 so it may be on a Goldstone or Madrid tape later.

I am going to finish G5-005 today....

G5-004, partial capture LOV-006M, 007H
G5-005, partial capture LOV-013M, complete capture 014H

Going to continue to go slowly, watching each tape closely until we wear the head down to the nubbin!

Lunar Orbiter 3 Image 3081_H3

This newly retrieved high resolution image, frame 3081_H3, was taken by Lunar Orbiter 3 on 17 February 1967 at 21:09 GMT LPI reference. Images: [large at LOIRP] [Very Large at NASA NLSI]

LOIRP Status Report 21 August 2013

Dennis WIngo: Well, can't resist continuing on. Running G5-003 right now. Looking good so far. There are two tapes in this sequence so I am going to do both of them today.

G5-003, partial capture LOV-008H, 006M

One thing that I am very much looking forward to is to assemble an image and make a photographic print of one of these full moon pictures of the far side of the Moon. With the greater dynamic range of our grey scales, these images should look spectacular!

End of Day

Well, can't resist continuing on. Running G5-003 right now. Looking good so far. There are two tapes in this sequence so I am going to do both of them today.

G5-003, partial capture LOV-008H, 006M

One thing that I am very much looking forward to is to assemble an image and make a photographic print of one of these full moon pictures of the far side of the Moon. With the greater dynamic range of our grey scales, these images should look spectacular!

Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project In The News

This Week in Photography History: The Lunar Orbiter 1 Takes the First Photograph of the Earth from the Moon, The Phoblographer

It was originally designed to photograph the smooth lunar landscape. The images it took would then be parsed for ideal landing locations for the Surveyor and Apollo missions. The Lunar Orbiter 1 was the first American spacecraft to orbit the moon, and it was the first of five spacecraft in the Lunar Orbiter program that was operated between 1966 and 1967. The Surveyor program followed between 1966 and 1968, and the manned Apollo flights followed later from 1968 to 1972.

Abandoned McDonald's Houses NASA's Lunar Photo Project [Pics]

Lunar Orbiter 3 Image 3081_H2

This newly retrieved high resolution image, frame 3081_H2, was taken by Lunar Orbiter 3 on 17 February 1967 at 21:09 GMT LPI reference. Images: [large at LOIRP] [Very Large at NASA NLSI]

LOIRP Status Report 20 August 2013

Dennis Wingo: I couldn't help it. We needed to know the sequences in the tapes for Goldstone as the sequence numbers that we have used forever are missing. So, I ran the first Lunar Orbiter V Goldstone tape today with the nearly dead head. It worked pretty well. So it was captured and one more high res image down!

G5-001, partial capture LOV-006H (90 framelets)

We got almost a complete high res image and I can now figure out what sequence number it is from (002) and thus know what is coming next and how that fits with the Woomera data that we already have.

End of day update. G4-001 looked pretty good and there are two tapes in that sequence. Soooo....

G5-002, complete capture LOV-005H

Note that image 005H is the lowest numbered high resolution frame for Lunar Orbiter V. The Goldstone captures started three days before the Woomera ones for some reason so it bears to reason that for a while Goldstone has images that don't exist with the tapes we have already run. I may run another tape or two just to see how far I can go before the head completely dies, that is, if the image quality is still good.

Lunar Orbiter 3 Image 3081_H1

This newly retrieved high resolution image, frame 3081_H1, was taken by Lunar Orbiter 3 on 17 February 1967 at 21:09 GMT LPI reference. Images: [large at LOIRP] [Very Large at NASA NLSI]

Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project In The News

Abandoned McDonald's Holds Glimpse of Life on Moon, BloombergBusinessWeek

In this installment of Secret Valley, Bloomberg Businessweek's Ashlee Vance visits NASA's Ames Research Center where a forgotten McDonald's, nicknamed "McMoon's," serves as the headquarters for a project to digitize fifty year old photographs of the surface of the moon.

Video Offers a Glimpse Into NASA's Film Digitization Efforts in an Old McDonald's, PetaPixel

In July of last year, we introduced you to the Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP), an effort by the NASA Ames Research Center to digitize some 48,000 pounds of 70mm tape shot by the five lunar orbiters that were sent up to photograph the surface of the moon in preparation for the Apollo missions.

Priceless moon photos getting processed at an old McDonald's, Houston Chronicle

Near the Ames Research Center in the heart of California's Silicon Valley, a team funded by NASA is in the process of digitizing photos taken of the moon in the 1960s. These are pictures of the moon before men touched down, taken from five lunar orbiters that shot footage of it in preperation of exploration. Where they are doing it is the best part. The Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP) has been hard at work since July 2008 inside an old McDonald's location on the Ames campus converting 48,000 pounds of 70mm tape.

Lunar Orbiter 3 Image 3079_H2

This newly retrieved high resolution image, frame 3079_H2, was taken by Lunar Orbiter 3 on 17 February 1967 at 14:12 GMT LPI reference. Images: [large at LOIRP] [Very Large at NASA NLSI]

Crater Wargo

NASA Asks International Astronomical Union to Name Lunar Crater After Mike Wargo

"NASA is asking the International Astronomical Union to name a crater on the moon in his honor "so his name will be forever enshrined in the heavens."

- NASA Lunar Exploration Analysis Group Statement on the Passing of Dr. Michael Wargo, earlier post
- Mike Wargo, earlier post

Lunar Orbiter 3 Image 3079_H1

This newly retrieved high resolution image, frame 3079_H1, was taken by Lunar Orbiter 3 on 17 February 1967 at 14:12 GMT LPI reference. Images: [large at LOIRP] [Very Large at NASA NLSI]

Lunar Orbiter 3 Image 3065_H3

This newly retrieved high resolution image, frame 3065_H3, was taken by Lunar Orbiter 3 on 16 February 1967 at 17:19 GMT LPI reference. Images: [large at LOIRP] [Very Large at NASA NLSI]

Video: Abandoned McDonald's Holds Glimpse of Life on Moon

August 15 (Bloomberg) -- In this installment of Secret Valley, Bloomberg Businessweek's Ashlee Vance visits NASA's Ames Research Center where a forgotten McDonald's, nicknamed "McMoon's," serves as the headquarters for a project to digitize fifty year old photographs of the surface of the moon. (Source: Bloomberg)

Lunar Orbiter V's Mountains: Improving The View (Update)

Update: Compare our image (left) with the best quality USGS image (right) - Click on image to enlarge. Here's the full resolution TIFF image (caution: over 600MB). By the way the odd craters in the middle are Messier A and B.

Dennis Wingo: I love looking at the Moon. It is one of my little joys in doing the LOIRP project that I get to look at amazing images of the Moon that we get that look so incredible. Just by chance yesterday I was looking through some processed framelets because I had a discrepancy between what I was recording in my log book of the Lunar Orbiter sequence numbers and the framelets on the tapes as recorded by NASA. I happened upon image LOV-041M from tapes W5-154, 155.

I started looking at the framelets and found the super cool oblique shots interesting when looking at them on the 30" Apple high res monitor. We just had to get that image and so we found that we were missing a few framelets due to a tape change and thus we got the rest off of a Goldstone tape (G5-145).

Last night Austin ran the framelets through our assembly and image processing program and left me the frame. I loaded it on my computer this morning and was just simply blown away by it when zooming in. It seriously looks like you are on a spacecraft about 50 km above the surface looking down. The first image here is a zoom into the upper right quadrant of that image. The second image is from the Arizona State Quickmap looking straight down into the same area.

One thing that is just so fascinating to me is how much more I get out of the oblique images when trying to get a sense of an area. You can actually see how high a mountain is that just looks like a bump when looking down on it from a vertical perspective. This is making me revise my estimation of the value of many of the LO images because it is extremely difficult for the LROC camera, if not impossible, to get images like this.

Today the full res frame will go up on the NLSI web server and we will provide the link to the 691 megabyte image. Hope you have a good network connection! I will post the link to the high res image when Teague gets it on the server! Update: Here's the full resolution image (over 600MB)

Click on images to enlarge

Reassembling a Third FR-900 Tape Drive

Dennis Wingo: This is Jacob Gold's last days with us and one of the projects that we have wanted to get done is to reassemble the third FR-900 tape drive. We are not going to try and get it working as it is a record only machine and we don't really need to record anything! However, we can use it to possibly raise money. We want to get another head and if we can get $10k of it that would be great. NOTE. This thing weighs 900 lbs when reassembled and thus we are NOT going to ship it out of the Bay area. We MIGHT ship it to LA as will fit in the back of my truck. Just a thought. And here are a couple of pictures of Jacob working on the machine today.

Lunar Orbiter V View: Mountains on The Moon

Dennis Wingo: These two images here were captured from a frame let of our W5-155 tape, which is from image LOV-041M. The original image, at LPI is here. This is what our tiny blow up of that region looks like. We have both the raw (bottom) and the inverted (top) positive image, but with no other processing. We are blown away with what it looks like on the screen. Click on images to enlarge. We are looking forward to start seeing some image output!

LOIRP Status Report 12 August 2013

Dennis Wingo: Doing a bunch of clean up today, paperwork and processing framelets! That, to us, amazing image of the horizon from LOV-041, was a highlight. Austin is processing the entire medium resolution image and it should look great in full resolution.

We did run one tape today as the medium resolution image LOV-041m was spread across two tapes and was missing a few framelets. So our head, like Wesley in the movie princess bride, is just mostly dead. We use it when we absolutely have to in order to grab critical pieces of images. So we processed tape G5-145 today. Since we only needed a few framelets off it it, that one is considered done as it overlapped W5-154 and W5-155 and W5-018. Looks like this may help prove the thesis of a lot of overlaps in LOV. It was easy to tell the overlap as the capture time from all of the ground stations is in GMT time.

Here are the images for the tapes that were run last Thursday and Friday that are not recorded yet.

W5-151, partial capture 044M, 045H
W5-152, partial capture LOV-043M, 042M, complete capture 044H
W5-153, partial capture LOV-042M, 043H
W5-154, partial capture LOV-043H (completes image), partial capture 041M,
W5-155, partial capture LOV-041M (G5-145 completes this image), complete capture 042H
W5-156, complete capture LOV-040M, 041H (Messier and Messier A high res)
W5-157, complete capture LOV-039M, partial capture 040H,
W5-158, complete capture LOV-038M, 039H, partial capture 040H (completes image)
W5-159, partial capture LOV-037M, complete capture 038H
W5-160, complete capture 036M, 037H, partial capture 035M
W5-161, partial capture LOV-012H
W5-162, partial capture LOV-012H, 011H, complete capture 010M
W5-163, partial capture LOV-011H, 010H, complete capture 009M

It annoys me that toward the end here they changed tapes in the middle of a high resolution or medium resolution frame, even though the missing pieces are found on other tapes.

LOIRP Status Report 7-8 August 2013

Dennis Wingo: End of Day August 8, 2013

Lots of tapes done today. Got all the way from W5-143 to W5-158. Not quite as good as it looks as we already had captured 156 and 157 early in the year, they being the tapes for LOV-041 the oblique crater Messier and Messier A. We have five tapes to go tomorrow and we will be done with Woomera tapes for LOV!

Then as soon as Austin gets the report together on the framelets captured we will start on the Goldstone LOV tapes. I have already opened a couple of cans and it looks like they started getting data a few days earlier....

Ok, tapes and images for today...

W5-143, partial capture LOV-067H, complete capture 065M, 066H
W5-144, partial capture LOV-064M, complete capture 065H
W5-145, partial capture LOV-063M, complete capture 064H
W5-146, partial capture LOV-062M, 063H
W5-147, partial capture LOV-063H (completes image)
W5-148, partial capture LOV-061M, complete capture 062H
W5-149, partial capture LOV-060M, complete capture 061H
W5-150, partial capture LOV-059M, 050H

Will do the rest in the morning, found an error in the original NASA document but need time to figure out.

Five more to go for Woomera LOV!

Mid Day, August 8, 2013

Running tape again today. Lots of looong captures..... Running W5-148 right now. Hope to get into the mid 50's today and be done with Woomera tomorrow!

Here are the tapes from yesterday...

W5-138, complete capture LOV-087M, 088H
W5-139, partial capture LOV-070H
W5-140, complete capture LOV-068M, 069H
W5-141, complete capture LOV-067M, 068H
W5-142, complete capture LOV-066M, partial capture 067H

Toward the end of the day today status, August 7, 2013.

I did not start doing tapes until the afternoon as I had a paper to get out today. Right now I am running W5-142. Here are the tapes that we did yesterday.

W5-124, partial capture LOV-098M, 099H, (completes images) 097M [image overlap with W5-38]
W5-125, partial capture LOV-097M, 098H
W5-126, partial capture LOV-098H (completes image) partial capture 096M
W5-127, partial capture LOV-096M, complete capture 097H
W5-128, complete capture LOV-095M, partial capture 096H (completes image) [image overlap with W5-36]
W5-129, partial capture LOV-095H [image overlap with W5-36]
W5-130, partial capture LOV-095H (completes image finally!)
W5-131, partial capture LOV-093M, complete capture 094H
W5-132, partial capture LOV-092M, (completes image), complete capture 093H [image overlap with W5-33]
W5-133, complete capture LOV-091M, 092H
W5-134, partial capture LOV-090M, 091H
W5-135, partial capture LOV-091H (completes image)
W5-136, complete capture LOV-089M, 090H
W5-137, complete capture LOV-088M, 089H

That is all from yesterday

The rest at the end of the day....

LOIRP Status Report 6 August 2013

Dennis Wingo: Got a lot of tapes done yesterday but the accounting is getting more difficult due to the overlaps now between the priority readouts and the final readouts.

This is shortening the amount of tape that has to be run but it is also going to make Austin's job of piecing the images together more difficult as well.

W5-111, complete capture LOV-142M,143H
W5-112, partial capture LOV-141M, 142H
W5-113, complete capture LOV-123M, 124H, partial capture 122M
W5-114, partial capture LOV-122M, 122H, complete capture 123H, 121M
W5-115, partial capture LOV-122H (completes image)
W5-116, partial capture LOV-120M, complete capture 121H
W5-117, partial capture LOV-119M, 120H
W5-118, complete capture 118M, partial capture 119H (completes image) [image overalp with W5-042]
W5-119, partial capture LOV-117M [image overlap with W5-042], partial capture 118H
W5-120, partial capture LOV-118H
W5-121, partial capture LOV-116M, 117H
W5-122, partial capture LOV-116H [image overlap with W5-043],
W5-123, complete capture LOV-114M, 115H, partial capture 113M

It is going to get a lot more complicated from here on out. As I suspected there is considerable overlap both within a single ground station readout (priority readout vs final readout, but we have to deal with the same thing from the other ground stations.

We are already up to W5-133 today due to the overlaps. This is good, but it makes our lives more difficult in accounting!

LOIRP Status Report 5 August 2013

Status Monday end of day. We got up through W5-123 today, 13 tapes, a good day. What we have started to find is overlaps between the priority readout and the final readout. I figured this considering the number of tapes we have but this will lower the number of tapes we have to run. We saved about 150 framelets or one long tape spread over three tapes today. Saves head life as well!!

Tomorrow morning we will skip an entire tape and start on W5-125.

That means we have 36 or fewer tapes to go to finish Woomera this week!

Mike Wargo

Keith's note: According the NLSI Twitter: "NASA's chief exploration scientist, Mike Wargo, passed away unexpectedly yesterday. We will miss his leadership and friendship enormously." I'll post more information as I receive it. Very sad - Mike was such a nice person and believed in space exploration in a very personal way. He was also a big supporter of the LOIRP.

NASA Lunar Exploration Analysis Group Statement on the Passing of Dr. Michael Wargo

"The Lunar Exploration Analysis Group (LEAG) on behalf of the broader lunar community wishes to expresses its deep shock and sadness at the news that Dr. Mike Wargo passed away unexpectedly over the weekend of August 3-4, 2013. Mike was the Executive Secretary of LEAG and championed the Moon at NASA HQ."

Keith's update: This note is being circulated within and outside of NASA: "With deep sadness, I must tell you that our friend and colleague, Mike Wargo, passed away unexpectedly over the weekend. This news comes as a great shock to us all, and he will be missed terribly. In our grief, let us remember how Mike inspired us with his inexhaustible energy and enthusiasm, his hearty laugh and booming voice, and his dedication to NASA. Mike was HEOMD's chief exploration scientist, and his contributions to human exploration were many. He represented the directorate on the science teams for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and LCROSS missions, and most recently, he was a member of the Mars 2020 Science Definition Team. Mike led by example, working closely with colleagues in the lunar, planetary, and Mars science communities, to build collaborative and highly productive projects for both Exploration and Science. Please keep his wife Adele and his family in your thoughts and prayers during this difficult time. We will let you know about plans for the funeral and a NASA memorial service once they have been made."

Lunar Orbiter Tracking Stations

Dennis Wingo: We often talk about the ground stations for Lunar Orbiter. Here is a chart that shows the coverage of the DSIF (Deep Space Instrumentation Facility) the precursor of the Deep Space Network (DSN). for Woomera, Goldstone, and Johannesburg. In 1965 when this graphic was created, the Madrid station was still under construction. You can see the overlap between Woomera and Goldstone quite clearly. Out to lunar distance the overlap is even greater. Larger image.

LOIRP Status Report 2 August 2013

Dennis Wingo: These are the tapes we processed in the past three weeks. (larger image). Wow, when the week started, I started capturing tape W5-38. At this moment tape W5-110 is playing. However, tapes 53-62 and tapes 99-104 had been previously captured. So subtract 15 tapes and we have 58 tapes captured this week. That certainly is a record for the project. Here are the tapes captured today.

W5-095, complete capture LOV-176H
W5-096, complete capture LOV-174M, 175H
W5-097, partial capture LOV-173M, complete capture 174H
W5-098, complete capture LOV-172M, 173H
W5-99, (captured earlier in year)
W5-100 (captured earlier in year)
W5-101 (captured earlier in year)
W5-102 (captured earlier in year)
W5-103 (captured earlier in year)
W5-104 (captured earlier in year)
W5-105, partial capture LOV-134H (completes image), complete capture 132M
W5-106, complete capture 133H, 131M
W5-107, complete capture 132H, 130M
W5-108, partial capture 131H, 130H, complete capture 129M
W5-109, partial capture 130H (completes image), complete capture 128M
W5-110, partial capture 129H, complete capture 127M

It is my goal for next week to complete the captures for LOV-Woomera. That will be 51 tapes, a few less than this week.

A project record.

NASA Technoarchaeology at University of Alabama Huntsville

University of Alabama Huntsville: With billions of dollars of past space research at risk of being lost forever, Dr. Charles Lundquist is running a race against technology and time.

Director of the Interactive Projects Office at The University of Alabama in Huntsville's Research Institute, the 85-year-old Dr. Lundquist spent 40 years in high-level positions with the U.S. Army, the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, NASA, and finally the University of Alabama in Huntsville. He officially retired in 1999. Working as a volunteer since then, he spends his time sleuthing for past research from the Army, NASA and private papers, as well as collecting oral histories from NASA retirees and others. All are added to an archive on the ground floor of UAH's M. Louis Salmon Library, where Anne Coleman is a reference librarian and head of Archives and Special Collections. The archives preserve continued access for future historians, scholars and students.

Image: Dr. Charles Lundquist, director of Interactive Projects at the UAH Research Center, and Anne Coleman, reference librarian and head of Archives and Special Collections, with obsolete media containing data from the U.S. space program. The IBM printout that Dr. Lundquist is reading is the only surviving copy of the telemetry he needed for research from NASA's Gravity Probe A mission. The original tape from the 1976 flight is no longer readable. Larger image

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